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The Hockey Hall of Fame waited two years between announcing classes, choosing no group of inductees in 2021 due to the pandemic so it first could honor the 2020 class with an in-person ceremony. On Monday, the two-year wait proved worthwhile, as the Hall Selection Committee, meeting in person for the first time since 2019, inducted a large group, mixing first-year eligible names and a few who were long overdue in the player and builder categories.

Longtime Ottawa Senators captain Daniel Alfredsson, 49, eligible for induction since 2017, finally got the call Monday. During his 18-year career, he racked up 444 goals and 1,157 points, including a career-high 103 during the 2005-06 season. He won the Calder Trophy as the NHL’s top rookie in 1995-96, was named a second-team all-star in 2005-06, won the King Clancy Trophy in 2011-12 for his community work and took home the Mark Messier Leadership Award in 2012-13. ‘Alfie’ also led the 2006 gold-medallist Swedish Olympic team in scoring. From his debut in 1995-96 through his final season, spent with the Detroit Red Wings in 2013-14, only four players had more points than Alfredsson.

“It’s such an honor, it’s such a privilege to have been able to play this sport for a living, something I would have played for fun for my whole life without a question,” Alfredsson said on a post-induction conference call Monday. He added that he didn’t receive the news until about 8:00 p.m. Swedish time and was beginning to think he’d been passed over again. He expressed some extra gratitude toward Senators fans, who made a concerted social media effort to get him inducted this year with an #AlfietotheHall campaign.

Luongo, 43, earned the Hall call Monday as a first-year eligible player following a prolific career in which he was regularly one of the league’s top goaltenders. A three-time Vezina Trophy finalist and two-time second-team all-star, Luongo sits fourth on the NHL’s all-time wins list with 489 and ninth in save percentage at .919. He was the goaltender of record when Canada took home Olympic gold at the 2010 Vancouver Winter Games and backstopped the Vancouver Canucks to within a single win of their first Stanley Cup in 2010-11. In 2008, he became the first goalie in more than 60 years to be named captain of an NHL team. By the end of his career, was almost as famous for his social media presence as he was for his play on the ice, and that was fitting: Luongo was a progressive thinker, ahead of the curve, and he applied that philosophy to the evolution of his own game.

“That’s what helped me stay in the league for a long time,” he said on the call. “I didn’t just rely on what I knew. I was always willing to learn and improve myself and get better every day and be open minded with new techniques around goaltending, to keep up with the times and not get stuck in my ways and stay the same.”

Sallinen, 49, becomes the first Finnish women’s player inducted to the Hall after a dominant career in which she was often overlooked compared to her higher-profile Canadian and American rivals. Not only did she lead the 1998 Nagano Olympics in scoring, but she was a mainstay on Finnish national teams for multiple decades and, remarkably, returned to international competition after a 12-year hiatus and helped Finland medal at the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics when she was in her mid-40s. She is the oldest player to win an Olympic medal and one of the greatest forwards in women’s hockey history. As Hall of Fame Selection Committee chair Mike Gartner explained Monday, the Hall had not yet successfully reached Sallinen, so she wasn’t present for the conference call.

Daniel and Henrik Sedin, 41, drafted back to back to the Canucks in 1999, had to enter the Hall together. It would’ve been strange had they not. As twins they forged, arguably, the most telepathic bond between teammates in pro hockey history, both accumulating more than 1,000 points and leading some dominant Canucks teams. Henrik won the Art Ross Trophy as the NHL’s leading scorer in 2009-10 and took home the Hart Trophy as MVP that same season, while Daniel won the scoring crown the following season and captured the Ted Lindsay Award for most outstanding player as voted by the players. Their complementary styles – Henrik the playmaker, Daniel the scorer – made them perfectly suited linemates. Remarkably, the durable Sedins finished just 24 games and 29 points apart in their careers.

Speaking on the call Monday, Daniel Sedin expressed that, after he stopped playing, he didn’t really think about getting inducted to the Hall, but that it nevertheless felt extra special knowing he and Henrik are going in together. Alfredsson expressed his amazement on Monday that the Sedins played so long together without becoming enemies, and Daniel admitted that there was some healthy fire between the brothers at times.

“I think our goal was always to be the best players that we could be, and we tried to help each other do that,” Daniel Sedin said. “The competition side of us fuelled us, each and every day, wanting to beat Henrik, from when we were kids…In the end, if you lost, you sucked it up and moved on and tried to be better. We had our moments where we were not to happy with each other…it was more about things that happened on the ice, or I expected him to be better at certain parts of the game, but it very rarely happened.”

In the builder category, the fight to honor Herb Carnegie has finally paid off with a posthumous induction, 10 years after his death in 2012. While Willie O’Ree is famous for breaking the NHL’s color barrier in 1958, Carnegie was hockey’s first black superstar, dominating senior circuits in the era preceding O’Ree’s, playing on four Allan Cup teams. Carnegie had the necessary talent to be a dominant NHL player but was barred from competing at the time on account of his race. According to accounts from multiple Hall of Fame NHL players, Carnegie had the skills to be a star in his day had any NHL team given him a chance. He also founded one of Canada’s first hockey schools, Future Aces, in 1955 following his playing career. On Monday, Carnegie finally got long overdue acknowledgement for his contributions to hockey history.

“It’s special. My grandfather, in the BIPOC community and the sport of hockey, he was my biggest cheerleader and my role model,” said Rane Carnegie, Herb’s grandson, who had campaigned with petitions for years to get Herb inducted. “And now he’s been given the highest honor that you can get from a hockey player, to be called to the Hall and to be enshrined with the greatest. Our family is through the moon. I’m speechless. It’s been a long time coming, a lot of people, tireless efforts to help make the game more inclusive, and we’re just so thankful that we’re getting him to the place where he belongs.”

“This is just so important to so many people out there who believed in my father and everything he has done over the years,” said Bernice Carnegie, Herb’s daughter. “I’m so proud of my father and so proud to know that you’ve recognized him at this time so that so many people out there can just jump for joy, just the way our family is.”

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Date: 06/27/2022
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The Hockey Hall of Fame announced the Class of 2022 on Monday and it features a number of hockey greats.

Herb Carnegie is being inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame as a builder. Carnegie was a black Toronto-born hockey player who played in Ontario and Quebec throughout the 1940’s and 1950’s, but never made it to the NHL due to racism in the game.

He almost made the NHL back in 1948 when the New York Rangers invited him to training camp. Carnegie was eventually offered a contract to play for their minor league team, but it was less than what he made playing on Sherbrooke St. Francis, so he declined.

Carnegie, though, was argued to be the “first Black Canadian hockey star” and “the best Black player to never play in the NHL,” according to The Canadian Encyclopedia.

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“He believed, like many, that his African heritage was the sole reason he was unable to break into the league. In several interviews, he recalled being devastated by the alleged (and widespread) remark by Maple Leafs boss Conn Smythe that he would sign Carnegie if only someone could ‘turn him white.'”

During his last year of hockey, Carnegie founded one of Canada’s first hockey schools called Future Aces.

He eventually became a member of the Order of Ontario and the Order of Canada for his work training young hockey players. Carnegie also wrote a book called “Future Aces Creed” and created the  Herbert H. Carnegie Future Aces Foundation which “affects the lives of more than 100,000 students annually across Ontario.

Carnegie unfortunately passed away back in March of 2012.

One Women’s hockey player will be a part of the Class of 2022 and her name is Riikka Sallinen. Already in the Finnish and IIHF Hall of Fame, Sallinen becomes just the ninth women to be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

The Finnish native spent 16 seasons with the Finland Women’s National Team, earning two Olympic bronze medals, one World Championship silver plus six bronze medals, and three European Championship gold medals.

Sallinen is also the oldest hockey player to ever win a medal in ice hockey at 44, beating out Finnish legend Teemu Selanne who won a medal at 43.

The rest of the Class of 2022 includes Daniel Alfredsson, Daniel and Henrik Sedin, as well as Roberto Luongo.

For more information on the Hockey Hall of Fame Class of 2022 festivities, click here. Induction Weekend will take place from November 11th to November 14th in Toronto.

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Date: 06/27/2022
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A pair of Calgary Flames prospects are off to the 2022 Memorial Cup Final.

Saint John Sea Dogs defencemen Jeremie Poirier and Yan Kuznetsov will look to capture the most prestigious trophy in Canadian junior hockey on Wednesday when they face either the Hamilton Bulldogs or the Shawinigan Cataractes.

The Bulldogs and Cataractes are set to do battle in the tournament semifinal on Monday evening, with the winner earning a spot in the championship game against the host Sea Dogs.

Poirier punched the Sea Dogs’ ticket to the final with the game-winning goal over Shawinigan in the final round-robin game on Saturday. Saint John came back from a 3–0 deficit to capture the game 5–3.

The Sea Dogs have put their best foot forward at the Memorial Cup, earning a bye to the championship game after posting the best record in the preliminary round.

Saint John has found success at the Memorial Cup after being upset by the Rimouski Océanic in the first round of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League playoffs.

After its early playoff exit, the Sea Dogs took the unusual step of firing head coach Gordie Dwyer a month before they were set to host one of hockey’s biggest tournaments.

Luckily, the Sea Dogs had a tailor-made replacement available to them: Gardiner MacDougall, who has overseen the dynastic hockey program at the University of New Brunswick since 2000. Under MacDougall’s watch, UNB has won seven national titles.

FlamesNation spoke to MacDougall last year to gather some insight on the role the Canadian collegiate hockey system plays in developing future professionals. Now, that same coach is one win away from capturing the Memorial Cup with two of the Flames’ top prospects, both of whom are set to join the professional ranks next season.

Poirier and Kuznetsov have been two of the Sea Dogs’ most impactful defenders at the Memorial Cup. After Connor Zary, the two rearguards were the Flames’ first selections at the 2020 NHL Draft.

Kuznetsov, selected No. 50 overall by Calgary in 2020, has one goal and three points with Saint John at the Memorial Cup. The 6’4″ left-handed defender managed two goals and 13 points in 25 games with the Sea Dogs during the 2021–22 regular season.

Poirier, selected No. 72 overall in 2020, also has one goal and three points at the Memorial Cup. The two Sea Dogs are tied for the Memorial Cup defenceman scoring lead (Luke Prokop, Kaiden Guhle, and Arber Xhekaj also have three points, although Prokop and Guhle have already been eliminated).

New York Islanders prospect William Dufour has been the Sea Dogs’ offensive engine at the tournament, scoring six goals in three games — including four in the comeback win over Shawinigan on Saturday.

The Cataractes will be able to force a rematch with Saint John if they can defeat the Bulldogs on Monday evening (4:00 p.m. MT, TSN).

A pair of recent first-round picks have led the way for Shawinigan to this point: Xavier Bourgault (Edmonton Oilers) and Mavrik Bourque (Dallas Stars) both have six points in three games.

Hamilton’s offence has been more spread out, although 2021 third-overall pick Mason McTavish currently sits in a tie for the team lead with three goals in three games. Undrafted Bulldogs goaltender Marco Constantini leads the tournament with a .918 save percentage.

The Edmonton Oil Kings have already been eliminated from contention at the Memorial Cup after posting just one overtime win in their three round-robin games.

Poirier, Kuznetsov, and the Sea Dogs will play for the Memorial Cup title at home on Wednesday at 4:00 p.m. MT.


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The Hockey Hall of Fame announced its 2022 Class of inductees on Monday afternoon, and three of them played for the Vancouver Canucks.

Daniel Sedin, Henrik Sedin, and Roberto Luongo have all been inducted into the Hall in their first year of eligibility.

Daniel Alfredsson, Riika Sallinen, and Herb Carnegie round out the Class of 2022. Carnegie was inducted in the builder category.

The Sedin twins played their entire careers with the Canucks after being selected by the team in the first round of the 1999 NHL Draft. Both Sedins were born in Örnsköldsvik, Sweden on September 26, 1980.

Henrik played 1,330 regular-season games with the Canucks from 2000 to 2018, scoring 240 goals and 1,070 points. He won the Art Ross Trophy and the Hart Memorial Trophy in 2010 and was named to the league’s end-of-year First All-Star Team in 2010 and 2011.

Daniel scored 393 goals and 1,041 points in 1,306 games with the Canucks from 2000 to 2018. He won the Art Ross Trophy and the Ted Lindsay Trophy in 2011, finishing second in voting for the Hart, and was named to the First All-Star Team in 2011.

Both Sedins helped the Canucks reach the 2011 Stanley Cup Final, where they fell to the Boston Bruins in seven games. The twins captured Olympic gold with Team Sweden at the 2006 Turin Olympics, while Daniel won silver at the 2014 Sochi Olympics (Henrik missed the tournament due to injury).

Luongo, 43, played eight seasons with the Canucks from 2006 to 2014, also spending time with the Florida Panthers and New York Islanders during his 19-year NHL career.

In 448 career games with the Canucks, Luongo posted a 252–137–50 record, 38 shutouts, and a .919 save percentage. He captured the 2011 William M. Jennings Trophy and was twice named a Vezina Trophy finalist during his tenure in Vancouver.

Luongo was the starting goaltender for Team Canada at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver and was on the ice when Sidney Crosby scored his iconic “Golden Goal” against Team USA.

Only three goaltenders in NHL history amassed more career wins than Luongo’s 489: Martin Brodeur (691), Patrick Roy (551), and Marc-Andre Fleury (520). Luongo finished with a 489–392–33–91 record in 1,044 career games with the Islanders, Panthers, and Canucks between 1999 and 2019.

Notably not inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame: Alexander Mogilny, who has been eligible since 2009. Mogilny amassed 1,032 points in 990 career NHL games, including 308 points in 312 games with the Canucks from 1995 to 2000.

The Hockey Hall of Fame will hold its official induction ceremony for the Class of 2022 in Toronto on November 14.

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The 2022 Stanley Cup champion Colorado Avalanche just completed one of the most dominant Cup runs in NHL history. They went 16-4 defeating Nashville, St. Louis, Edmonton, and Tampa Bay to hoist the Cup. The Avs tied the 2012 Los Angeles Kings, 1997 Detroit Red Wings, 1995 New Jersey Devils and 1993 Montreal Canadiens at 16-4. Only the 1988 Edmonton Oilers were better going 16-2.

Colorado did it with an Avalanche of offence. They scored 4.25 goals/game which is the 11th highest (teams who played minimum 16 games) and the highest since the 1988 Oilers averaged 4.67 goals/game. The NHL has often been a copycat league, and hopefully, more teams will try to mirror the speed, skill and style of the Avs. They won with more of an emphasis on offence, than on defence. They showed in the third period, they can lock it down defensively, when needed, but much of their run to the Cup was built on the strength of their puck moving and offensive skillset.

Hockey is the best when speed and skill are at the forefront. The Avs were that, and more, and I hope they are ushering in a new era of NHL hockey. I don’t think people realize how dominant they were offensively.

They averaged 4.25 goals/game. The 2021 Tampa Bay Lightning, a highly skilled team, averaged 3.26 goals/game. The Avs averaged one more goal every playoff game. Tampa allowed 1.96 goals/game, while the Avs were at 2.75.

Colorado’s games averaged a total of 7.00 goals/game, while the 2021 Lightning averaged 5.22. More offence leads to more lead changes and more excitement. NHL games with an average score of 4-3 is ideal.

But the Avs offence was the story. In the 2000s we have seen 86 teams play at least 16 games in a playoff year.

The Avs had the most goals at 4.25/game. Here the nine teams who rounded out the top-10.

2022 Edmonton Oilers at 4.06 G/GP in 16 games.
2018 Washington Capitals at 3.58 in 24 games.
2015 Anaheim Ducks at 3.56 in 16 games.
2010 Chicago Blackhawks at 3.55 in 22 games.
2014 Los Angeles Kings with 3.38 in 26 games.
2006 Buffalo Sabres at 3.33 in 18 games.
2009 Detroit Red Wings with 3.30 in 23 games.
2010 Philadelphia Flyers at 3.30 in 23 games.
2019 Boston Bruins and 2009 Pittsburgh Penguins each at 3.29 in 24 games.

The Avalanche averaged 0.67 goals/game more than every team in the last 22 years, except the Oilers, who had Connor McDavid and Leon Draisaitl each averaging two points/game. The Avalanche were the most exciting offensive Cup Champion in decades, and I hope more teams try to emulate their success.

OFF-SEASON BEGINS…

Jun 24, 2022; Denver, Colorado, USA; Colorado Avalanche center Andrew Cogliano (11) moves the puck against the Tampa Bay Lightning during the second period in game five of the 2022 Stanley Cup Final at Ball Arena. Mandatory Credit: Ron Chenoy-USA TODAY Sports

The Avalanche parade is on Thursday, but the off-season has officially begun. And, oh baby, are there many juicy story lines and angles across the NHL.

The San Jose Sharks need a general manager. Will it be Scott Nichol? Owner Hasso Plattner believes the team can re-tool quickly, but is that realistic? It is hard to fathom with the age and salary of their top players.

The Winnipeg Jets, Detroit Red Wings and Boston Bruins need a head coach. What direction are the Jets going in? Will they dismantle their team as Blake Wheeler, Mark Schiefele and Connor Hellebuyck only have two years remaining and Pierre-Luc Dubois is on record as saying he won’t sign longer than two years so he can test free agency. Do they need a younger coach who can work with young players? The Bruins still have many quality veterans, while the Red Wings look like a team on the rise. Both jobs are attractive for different reasons.

Will Johnny Gaudreau leave Calgary? Will Filip Forsberg leave Nashville? Two excellent offensive players could hit the market.
What will Pittsburgh do with Kris Letang and Evgeni Malkin? Will they re-sign or test the market? I’d expect Letang to have many suitors.

Nazem Kadri scored 87 points in 73 games this past season, crushing his previous high of 61 points. He turns 32 in October. In 2021 he has the second-lowest point-per-game season of his career when he tallied 32 points in 56 games (0.57 points/game). His 1.23 points/game from this season was easily his best, but how realistic is it he’ll come close to that again? His previous best was 0.92 with Toronto in 2013 when he scored 44 points in 48 games during the shortened season. His next three seasons he scored 50, 39 and 45 in full seasons. He’s an important piece for the Avs, but he turns 32 in October and last year seems like an offensive outlier.

The goalie carousel will be very busy. Darcy Kuemper, Marc-Andre Fleury, Jack Campbell, Ville Husso, Casey DeSmith, Martin Jones, Braden Holtby, Scott Wedgewood, Jaroslav Halak, Eric Comrie, Charlie Lindgren and David Rittich are all UFAs.

Alexandar Georgiev is an RFA and will be traded by the Rangers. It seems New Jersey is ready to move on from McKenzie Blackwood.

Even though he didn’t have a great playoffs, I could see Kuemper re-signing in Colorado. But many teams will be looking for a starter, a backup or a tandem starter (half the games). I think the best value signing will be Wedgewood.

Letang (if he doesn’t re-sign in Pittsburgh) and John Klingberg are the two best offensive D-man on the market. Both shoot right. If a team is looking for offence from the blueline they are the leaders by far. Letang had 68 points, and Klingberg had 47. Ben Chiarot was next at 26 among UFA D-men.

The lack of offensive punch is why I believe Tyson Barrie could be a valuable trade chip if the Oilers opt to move him. He’s averaged 0.67 points/game over his last nine seasons and a $4.5m cap hit for two years for an offensive-minded D-man who can run the powerplay is good value.

Evander Kane’s arbitration case with the Sharks won’t occur prior to the start of free agency. This could lower his cap hit and term as teams who are interested might not wait, and rather sign other forwards first.

The list of forwards who scored 20 goals last season include: Forsberg (42), Gaudreau (40), Kadri (28), David Perron (27), Valeri Nichuskin (25), Patrice Bergeron (25, although he will only sign in Boston), Nino Niederreiter (24), Andre Burakovsky (22), Kane (22 in 43 games), Vincent Trocheck, Claude Giroux, Paul Stastny, Ryan Strome, Andrew Copp and Ilya Mikheyev (21) and Rickard Rakell and Malkin (20).

Over the past three seasons, the leaders in combined goals among those forwards are Bergeron (79), Gaudreau (77), Forsberg (75), Perron (71), and Kane (70).

Important Dates…

July 1st: First buyout window open.
July 2nd: Deadline for club-elected salary arbitration.
July 7th: Round one of NHL draft. It is on Thursday this year.
July 8th: Rounds 2-7 of NHL Draft.
July 11th: Teams need to submit qualifying offers by 3 p.m. MT.
July 12th: First buyout period ends.
July 13th: Free agency begins at 10 a.m. MT, noon ET.
July 17th: Deadline for player-elected salary arbitration. Kailer Yamamoto and Jesse Puljujarvi, Tyler Benson and Brendan Perlini are arbitration eligible.
July 22th: Qualifying offers expire.
July 27th to August 11th: Arbitration hearings.

Next week should present quite a few significant trades in the NHL. Many teams are looking to either shed salary, or alter the look of their team. I’ve mentioned Barrie as a legit trade candidate for months, and I expect those talks to heat up leading up to the draft. Georgiev, Blackwood, Kevin Fiala and Alex DeBrincat are some names we expect to move. I also see Las Vegas, Toronto, Philadelphia, both New York teams, Vancouver, and Montreal looking to make significant moves. Coyotes GM Bill Armstrong told me he is very open to adding salary if it comes with draft picks. The Sabres already did that with Ben Bishop, and I could see them doing it again.

The Carolina Hurricanes are another team I’m curious to see how they approach trades and free agency. How can they improve their team? Luc Robitaille was our guest on the DFO rundown heading into the playoffs and he said the Kings are now entering the competitive mode. They have lots of trade capital (deep prospect pool) if they are inclined to make a big move.

The next few weeks should be great theatre, just like watching the Avalanche during their run to the Cup.

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Date: 06/27/2022
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The Hockey Hall of Fame waited two years between announcing classes, choosing no group of inductees in 2021 due to the pandemic so it first could honor the 2020 class with an in-person ceremony. On Monday, the two-year wait proved worthwhile, as the Hall Selection Committee, meeting in person for the first time since 2019, inducted a large group, mixing first-year eligible names and a few who were long overdue in the player and builder categories.

Longtime Ottawa Senators captain Daniel Alfredsson, 49, eligible for induction since 2017, finally got the call Monday. During his 18-year career, he racked up 444 goals and 1,157 points, including a career-high 103 during the 2005-06 season. He won the Calder Trophy as the NHL’s top rookie in 1995-96, was named a second-team all-star in 2005-06, won the King Clancy Trophy in 2011-12 for his community work and took home the Mark Messier Leadership Award in 2012-13. ‘Alfie’ also led the 2006 gold-medallist Swedish Olympic team in scoring. From his debut in 1995-96 through his final season, spent with the Detroit Red Wings in 2013-14, only four players had more points than Alfredsson.

“It’s such an honor, it’s such a privilege to have been able to play this sport for a living, something I would have played for fun for my whole life without a question,” Alfredsson said on a post-induction conference call Monday. He added that he didn’t receive the news until about 8:00 p.m. Swedish time and was beginning to think he’d been passed over again. He expressed some extra gratitude toward Senators fans, who made a concerted social media effort to get him inducted this year with an #AlfietotheHall campaign.

Luongo, 43, earned the Hall call Monday as a first-year eligible player following a prolific career in which he was regularly one of the league’s top goaltenders. A three-time Vezina Trophy finalist and two-time second-team all-star, Luongo sits fourth on the NHL’s all-time wins list with 489 and ninth in save percentage at .919. He was the goaltender of record when Canada took home Olympic gold at the 2010 Vancouver Winter Games and backstopped the Vancouver Canucks to within a single win of their first Stanley Cup in 2010-11. In 2008, he became the first goalie in more than 60 years to be named captain of an NHL team. By the end of his career, was almost as famous for his social media presence as he was for his play on the ice, and that was fitting: Luongo was a progressive thinker, ahead of the curve, and he applied that philosophy to the evolution of his own game.

“That’s what helped me stay in the league for a long time,” he said on the call. “I didn’t just rely on what I knew. I was always willing to learn and improve myself and get better every day and be open minded with new techniques around goaltending, to keep up with the times and not get stuck in my ways and stay the same.”

Sallinen, 49, becomes the first Finnish women’s player inducted to the Hall after a dominant career in which she was often overlooked compared to her higher-profile Canadian and American rivals. Not only did she lead the 1998 Nagano Olympics in scoring, but she was a mainstay on Finnish national teams for multiple decades and, remarkably, returned to international competition after a 12-year hiatus and helped Finland medal at the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics when she was in her mid-40s. She is the oldest player to win an Olympic medal and one of the greatest forwards in women’s hockey history. As Hall of Fame Selection Committee chair Mike Gartner explained Monday, the Hall had not yet successfully reached Sallinen, so she wasn’t present for the conference call.

Daniel and Henrik Sedin, 41, drafted back to back to the Canucks in 1999, had to enter the Hall together. It would’ve been strange had they not. As twins they forged, arguably, the most telepathic bond between teammates in pro hockey history, both accumulating more than 1,000 points and leading some dominant Canucks teams. Henrik won the Art Ross Trophy as the NHL’s leading scorer in 2009-10 and took home the Hart Trophy as MVP that same season, while Daniel won the scoring crown the following season and captured the Ted Lindsay Award for most outstanding player as voted by the players. Their complementary styles – Henrik the playmaker, Daniel the scorer – made them perfectly suited linemates. Remarkably, the durable Sedins finished just 24 games and 29 points apart in their careers.

Speaking on the call Monday, Daniel Sedin expressed that, after he stopped playing, he didn’t really think about getting inducted to the Hall, but that it nevertheless felt extra special knowing he and Henrik are going in together. Alfredsson expressed his amazement on Monday that the Sedins played so long together without becoming enemies, and Daniel admitted that there was some healthy fire between the brothers at times.

“I think our goal was always to be the best players that we could be, and we tried to help each other do that,” Daniel Sedin said. “The competition side of us fuelled us, each and every day, wanting to beat Henrik, from when we were kids…In the end, if you lost, you sucked it up and moved on and tried to be better. We had our moments where we were not to happy with each other…it was more about things that happened on the ice, or I expected him to be better at certain parts of the game, but it very rarely happened.”

In the builder category, the fight to honor Herb Carnegie has finally paid off with a posthumous induction, 10 years after his death in 2012. While Willie O’Ree is famous for breaking the NHL’s color barrier in 1958, Carnegie was hockey’s first black superstar, dominating senior circuits in the era preceding O’Ree’s, playing on four Allan Cup teams. Carnegie had the necessary talent to be a dominant NHL player but was barred from competing at the time on account of his race. According to accounts from multiple Hall of Fame NHL players, Carnegie had the skills to be a star in his day had any NHL team given him a chance. He also founded one of Canada’s first hockey schools, Future Aces, in 1955 following his playing career. On Monday, Carnegie finally got long overdue acknowledgement for his contributions to hockey history.

“It’s special. My grandfather, in the BIPOC community and the sport of hockey, he was my biggest cheerleader and my role model,” said Rane Carnegie, Herb’s grandson, who had campaigned with petitions for years to get Herb inducted. “And now he’s been given the highest honor that you can get from a hockey player, to be called to the Hall and to be enshrined with the greatest. Our family is through the moon. I’m speechless. It’s been a long time coming, a lot of people, tireless efforts to help make the game more inclusive, and we’re just so thankful that we’re getting him to the place where he belongs.”

“This is just so important to so many people out there who believed in my father and everything he has done over the years,” said Bernice Carnegie, Herb’s daughter. “I’m so proud of my father and so proud to know that you’ve recognized him at this time so that so many people out there can just jump for joy, just the way our family is.”

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The post Hockey Hall of Fame inducts Class of 2022: Daniel Alfredsson, Roberto Luongo, Riikka Sallinen, Daniel and Henrik Sedin, Herb Carnegie appeared first on Daily Faceoff.

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Date: 06/27/2022
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The Hockey Hall of Fame announced the Class of 2022 on Monday and it features a number of hockey greats.

Herb Carnegie is being inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame as a builder. Carnegie was a black Toronto-born hockey player who played in Ontario and Quebec throughout the 1940’s and 1950’s, but never made it to the NHL due to racism in the game.

He almost made the NHL back in 1948 when the New York Rangers invited him to training camp. Carnegie was eventually offered a contract to play for their minor league team, but it was less than what he made playing on Sherbrooke St. Francis, so he declined.

Carnegie, though, was argued to be the “first Black Canadian hockey star” and “the best Black player to never play in the NHL,” according to The Canadian Encyclopedia.

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“He believed, like many, that his African heritage was the sole reason he was unable to break into the league. In several interviews, he recalled being devastated by the alleged (and widespread) remark by Maple Leafs boss Conn Smythe that he would sign Carnegie if only someone could ‘turn him white.'”

During his last year of hockey, Carnegie founded one of Canada’s first hockey schools called Future Aces.

He eventually became a member of the Order of Ontario and the Order of Canada for his work training young hockey players. Carnegie also wrote a book called “Future Aces Creed” and created the  Herbert H. Carnegie Future Aces Foundation which “affects the lives of more than 100,000 students annually across Ontario.

Carnegie unfortunately passed away back in March of 2012.

One Women’s hockey player will be a part of the Class of 2022 and her name is Riikka Sallinen. Already in the Finnish and IIHF Hall of Fame, Sallinen becomes just the ninth women to be inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.

The Finnish native spent 16 seasons with the Finland Women’s National Team, earning two Olympic bronze medals, one World Championship silver plus six bronze medals, and three European Championship gold medals.

Sallinen is also the oldest hockey player to ever win a medal in ice hockey at 44, beating out Finnish legend Teemu Selanne who won a medal at 43.

The rest of the Class of 2022 includes Daniel Alfredsson, Daniel and Henrik Sedin, as well as Roberto Luongo.

For more information on the Hockey Hall of Fame Class of 2022 festivities, click here. Induction Weekend will take place from November 11th to November 14th in Toronto.

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Date: 06/27/2022
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A pair of Calgary Flames prospects are off to the 2022 Memorial Cup Final.

Saint John Sea Dogs defencemen Jeremie Poirier and Yan Kuznetsov will look to capture the most prestigious trophy in Canadian junior hockey on Wednesday when they face either the Hamilton Bulldogs or the Shawinigan Cataractes.

The Bulldogs and Cataractes are set to do battle in the tournament semifinal on Monday evening, with the winner earning a spot in the championship game against the host Sea Dogs.

Poirier punched the Sea Dogs’ ticket to the final with the game-winning goal over Shawinigan in the final round-robin game on Saturday. Saint John came back from a 3–0 deficit to capture the game 5–3.

The Sea Dogs have put their best foot forward at the Memorial Cup, earning a bye to the championship game after posting the best record in the preliminary round.

Saint John has found success at the Memorial Cup after being upset by the Rimouski Océanic in the first round of the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League playoffs.

After its early playoff exit, the Sea Dogs took the unusual step of firing head coach Gordie Dwyer a month before they were set to host one of hockey’s biggest tournaments.

Luckily, the Sea Dogs had a tailor-made replacement available to them: Gardiner MacDougall, who has overseen the dynastic hockey program at the University of New Brunswick since 2000. Under MacDougall’s watch, UNB has won seven national titles.

FlamesNation spoke to MacDougall last year to gather some insight on the role the Canadian collegiate hockey system plays in developing future professionals. Now, that same coach is one win away from capturing the Memorial Cup with two of the Flames’ top prospects, both of whom are set to join the professional ranks next season.

Poirier and Kuznetsov have been two of the Sea Dogs’ most impactful defenders at the Memorial Cup. After Connor Zary, the two rearguards were the Flames’ first selections at the 2020 NHL Draft.

Kuznetsov, selected No. 50 overall by Calgary in 2020, has one goal and three points with Saint John at the Memorial Cup. The 6’4″ left-handed defender managed two goals and 13 points in 25 games with the Sea Dogs during the 2021–22 regular season.

Poirier, selected No. 72 overall in 2020, also has one goal and three points at the Memorial Cup. The two Sea Dogs are tied for the Memorial Cup defenceman scoring lead (Luke Prokop, Kaiden Guhle, and Arber Xhekaj also have three points, although Prokop and Guhle have already been eliminated).

New York Islanders prospect William Dufour has been the Sea Dogs’ offensive engine at the tournament, scoring six goals in three games — including four in the comeback win over Shawinigan on Saturday.

The Cataractes will be able to force a rematch with Saint John if they can defeat the Bulldogs on Monday evening (4:00 p.m. MT, TSN).

A pair of recent first-round picks have led the way for Shawinigan to this point: Xavier Bourgault (Edmonton Oilers) and Mavrik Bourque (Dallas Stars) both have six points in three games.

Hamilton’s offence has been more spread out, although 2021 third-overall pick Mason McTavish currently sits in a tie for the team lead with three goals in three games. Undrafted Bulldogs goaltender Marco Constantini leads the tournament with a .918 save percentage.

The Edmonton Oil Kings have already been eliminated from contention at the Memorial Cup after posting just one overtime win in their three round-robin games.

Poirier, Kuznetsov, and the Sea Dogs will play for the Memorial Cup title at home on Wednesday at 4:00 p.m. MT.


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The Hockey Hall of Fame announced its 2022 Class of inductees on Monday afternoon, and three of them played for the Vancouver Canucks.

Daniel Sedin, Henrik Sedin, and Roberto Luongo have all been inducted into the Hall in their first year of eligibility.

Daniel Alfredsson, Riika Sallinen, and Herb Carnegie round out the Class of 2022. Carnegie was inducted in the builder category.

The Sedin twins played their entire careers with the Canucks after being selected by the team in the first round of the 1999 NHL Draft. Both Sedins were born in Örnsköldsvik, Sweden on September 26, 1980.

Henrik played 1,330 regular-season games with the Canucks from 2000 to 2018, scoring 240 goals and 1,070 points. He won the Art Ross Trophy and the Hart Memorial Trophy in 2010 and was named to the league’s end-of-year First All-Star Team in 2010 and 2011.

Daniel scored 393 goals and 1,041 points in 1,306 games with the Canucks from 2000 to 2018. He won the Art Ross Trophy and the Ted Lindsay Trophy in 2011, finishing second in voting for the Hart, and was named to the First All-Star Team in 2011.

Both Sedins helped the Canucks reach the 2011 Stanley Cup Final, where they fell to the Boston Bruins in seven games. The twins captured Olympic gold with Team Sweden at the 2006 Turin Olympics, while Daniel won silver at the 2014 Sochi Olympics (Henrik missed the tournament due to injury).

Luongo, 43, played eight seasons with the Canucks from 2006 to 2014, also spending time with the Florida Panthers and New York Islanders during his 19-year NHL career.

In 448 career games with the Canucks, Luongo posted a 252–137–50 record, 38 shutouts, and a .919 save percentage. He captured the 2011 William M. Jennings Trophy and was twice named a Vezina Trophy finalist during his tenure in Vancouver.

Luongo was the starting goaltender for Team Canada at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver and was on the ice when Sidney Crosby scored his iconic “Golden Goal” against Team USA.

Only three goaltenders in NHL history amassed more career wins than Luongo’s 489: Martin Brodeur (691), Patrick Roy (551), and Marc-Andre Fleury (520). Luongo finished with a 489–392–33–91 record in 1,044 career games with the Islanders, Panthers, and Canucks between 1999 and 2019.

Notably not inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame: Alexander Mogilny, who has been eligible since 2009. Mogilny amassed 1,032 points in 990 career NHL games, including 308 points in 312 games with the Canucks from 1995 to 2000.

The Hockey Hall of Fame will hold its official induction ceremony for the Class of 2022 in Toronto on November 14.

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Date: 06/27/2022
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The 2022 Stanley Cup champion Colorado Avalanche just completed one of the most dominant Cup runs in NHL history. They went 16-4 defeating Nashville, St. Louis, Edmonton, and Tampa Bay to hoist the Cup. The Avs tied the 2012 Los Angeles Kings, 1997 Detroit Red Wings, 1995 New Jersey Devils and 1993 Montreal Canadiens at 16-4. Only the 1988 Edmonton Oilers were better going 16-2.

Colorado did it with an Avalanche of offence. They scored 4.25 goals/game which is the 11th highest (teams who played minimum 16 games) and the highest since the 1988 Oilers averaged 4.67 goals/game. The NHL has often been a copycat league, and hopefully, more teams will try to mirror the speed, skill and style of the Avs. They won with more of an emphasis on offence, than on defence. They showed in the third period, they can lock it down defensively, when needed, but much of their run to the Cup was built on the strength of their puck moving and offensive skillset.

Hockey is the best when speed and skill are at the forefront. The Avs were that, and more, and I hope they are ushering in a new era of NHL hockey. I don’t think people realize how dominant they were offensively.

They averaged 4.25 goals/game. The 2021 Tampa Bay Lightning, a highly skilled team, averaged 3.26 goals/game. The Avs averaged one more goal every playoff game. Tampa allowed 1.96 goals/game, while the Avs were at 2.75.

Colorado’s games averaged a total of 7.00 goals/game, while the 2021 Lightning averaged 5.22. More offence leads to more lead changes and more excitement. NHL games with an average score of 4-3 is ideal.

But the Avs offence was the story. In the 2000s we have seen 86 teams play at least 16 games in a playoff year.

The Avs had the most goals at 4.25/game. Here the nine teams who rounded out the top-10.

2022 Edmonton Oilers at 4.06 G/GP in 16 games.
2018 Washington Capitals at 3.58 in 24 games.
2015 Anaheim Ducks at 3.56 in 16 games.
2010 Chicago Blackhawks at 3.55 in 22 games.
2014 Los Angeles Kings with 3.38 in 26 games.
2006 Buffalo Sabres at 3.33 in 18 games.
2009 Detroit Red Wings with 3.30 in 23 games.
2010 Philadelphia Flyers at 3.30 in 23 games.
2019 Boston Bruins and 2009 Pittsburgh Penguins each at 3.29 in 24 games.

The Avalanche averaged 0.67 goals/game more than every team in the last 22 years, except the Oilers, who had Connor McDavid and Leon Draisaitl each averaging two points/game. The Avalanche were the most exciting offensive Cup Champion in decades, and I hope more teams try to emulate their success.

OFF-SEASON BEGINS…

Jun 24, 2022; Denver, Colorado, USA; Colorado Avalanche center Andrew Cogliano (11) moves the puck against the Tampa Bay Lightning during the second period in game five of the 2022 Stanley Cup Final at Ball Arena. Mandatory Credit: Ron Chenoy-USA TODAY Sports

The Avalanche parade is on Thursday, but the off-season has officially begun. And, oh baby, are there many juicy story lines and angles across the NHL.

The San Jose Sharks need a general manager. Will it be Scott Nichol? Owner Hasso Plattner believes the team can re-tool quickly, but is that realistic? It is hard to fathom with the age and salary of their top players.

The Winnipeg Jets, Detroit Red Wings and Boston Bruins need a head coach. What direction are the Jets going in? Will they dismantle their team as Blake Wheeler, Mark Schiefele and Connor Hellebuyck only have two years remaining and Pierre-Luc Dubois is on record as saying he won’t sign longer than two years so he can test free agency. Do they need a younger coach who can work with young players? The Bruins still have many quality veterans, while the Red Wings look like a team on the rise. Both jobs are attractive for different reasons.

Will Johnny Gaudreau leave Calgary? Will Filip Forsberg leave Nashville? Two excellent offensive players could hit the market.
What will Pittsburgh do with Kris Letang and Evgeni Malkin? Will they re-sign or test the market? I’d expect Letang to have many suitors.

Nazem Kadri scored 87 points in 73 games this past season, crushing his previous high of 61 points. He turns 32 in October. In 2021 he has the second-lowest point-per-game season of his career when he tallied 32 points in 56 games (0.57 points/game). His 1.23 points/game from this season was easily his best, but how realistic is it he’ll come close to that again? His previous best was 0.92 with Toronto in 2013 when he scored 44 points in 48 games during the shortened season. His next three seasons he scored 50, 39 and 45 in full seasons. He’s an important piece for the Avs, but he turns 32 in October and last year seems like an offensive outlier.

The goalie carousel will be very busy. Darcy Kuemper, Marc-Andre Fleury, Jack Campbell, Ville Husso, Casey DeSmith, Martin Jones, Braden Holtby, Scott Wedgewood, Jaroslav Halak, Eric Comrie, Charlie Lindgren and David Rittich are all UFAs.

Alexandar Georgiev is an RFA and will be traded by the Rangers. It seems New Jersey is ready to move on from McKenzie Blackwood.

Even though he didn’t have a great playoffs, I could see Kuemper re-signing in Colorado. But many teams will be looking for a starter, a backup or a tandem starter (half the games). I think the best value signing will be Wedgewood.

Letang (if he doesn’t re-sign in Pittsburgh) and John Klingberg are the two best offensive D-man on the market. Both shoot right. If a team is looking for offence from the blueline they are the leaders by far. Letang had 68 points, and Klingberg had 47. Ben Chiarot was next at 26 among UFA D-men.

The lack of offensive punch is why I believe Tyson Barrie could be a valuable trade chip if the Oilers opt to move him. He’s averaged 0.67 points/game over his last nine seasons and a $4.5m cap hit for two years for an offensive-minded D-man who can run the powerplay is good value.

Evander Kane’s arbitration case with the Sharks won’t occur prior to the start of free agency. This could lower his cap hit and term as teams who are interested might not wait, and rather sign other forwards first.

The list of forwards who scored 20 goals last season include: Forsberg (42), Gaudreau (40), Kadri (28), David Perron (27), Valeri Nichuskin (25), Patrice Bergeron (25, although he will only sign in Boston), Nino Niederreiter (24), Andre Burakovsky (22), Kane (22 in 43 games), Vincent Trocheck, Claude Giroux, Paul Stastny, Ryan Strome, Andrew Copp and Ilya Mikheyev (21) and Rickard Rakell and Malkin (20).

Over the past three seasons, the leaders in combined goals among those forwards are Bergeron (79), Gaudreau (77), Forsberg (75), Perron (71), and Kane (70).

Important Dates…

July 1st: First buyout window open.
July 2nd: Deadline for club-elected salary arbitration.
July 7th: Round one of NHL draft. It is on Thursday this year.
July 8th: Rounds 2-7 of NHL Draft.
July 11th: Teams need to submit qualifying offers by 3 p.m. MT.
July 12th: First buyout period ends.
July 13th: Free agency begins at 10 a.m. MT, noon ET.
July 17th: Deadline for player-elected salary arbitration. Kailer Yamamoto and Jesse Puljujarvi, Tyler Benson and Brendan Perlini are arbitration eligible.
July 22th: Qualifying offers expire.
July 27th to August 11th: Arbitration hearings.

Next week should present quite a few significant trades in the NHL. Many teams are looking to either shed salary, or alter the look of their team. I’ve mentioned Barrie as a legit trade candidate for months, and I expect those talks to heat up leading up to the draft. Georgiev, Blackwood, Kevin Fiala and Alex DeBrincat are some names we expect to move. I also see Las Vegas, Toronto, Philadelphia, both New York teams, Vancouver, and Montreal looking to make significant moves. Coyotes GM Bill Armstrong told me he is very open to adding salary if it comes with draft picks. The Sabres already did that with Ben Bishop, and I could see them doing it again.

The Carolina Hurricanes are another team I’m curious to see how they approach trades and free agency. How can they improve their team? Luc Robitaille was our guest on the DFO rundown heading into the playoffs and he said the Kings are now entering the competitive mode. They have lots of trade capital (deep prospect pool) if they are inclined to make a big move.

The next few weeks should be great theatre, just like watching the Avalanche during their run to the Cup.

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Date: 06/26/2022
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