"It's incredible, I didn't believe I 'd get to be a part of something like this," Atwell stated. "Growing up I 'd see P.K. Subban or Akim however never this lots of visible minorities, especially on one team. Ryan Sirisombath, left, and Enrico Champagne, right, are 2 gamers on the group."What I like about hockey is the competitiveness,"stated Enrico Champagne, one of the players on the group. "I like hockey due to the fact that I like scoring goals and I can't wait to go to the

NHL and live my dream,"said Ryan Sirisombath, another player on the team.

More than 100 youth hockey groups completed in a tournament this weekend in Toronto-- but one group made an extremely unique launching.

Previous Canadian NHL hockey player Akim Aliu assisted to establish a very first of its kind BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Colour) team that played in the tournament in the Westwood Arena in Etobicoke.

"I didn't think something like this would ever happen," Aliu told CBC Toronto on the weekend. "I'm kind of speechless to be able to offer this for the kids."

The team was established by Aliu's Time to Dream Foundation, an organization developed to assist underprivileged youth "prosper in life through sport" by making sports more inclusive, varied and available.

The cause hits near house for the previous professional athlete.

Aliu stated he didn't always have the monetary opportunities to play hockey and in competitions when he was maturing.

Aliu said providing funds for the hockey team strikes near to house because maturing

he didn't constantly have the financial opportunities to play in tournaments.( Talia Ricci/CBC)He has likewise been singing about the racial abuse he suffered during his hockey profession. The 31-year-old journeyman played a total of seven NHL video games with the Calgary Flames before bouncing around different other leagues.

In November 2019, Aliu published a series of tweets describing the racist experiences he suffered throughout his time in expert hockey, consisting of particular examples with now-former Flames coach Bill Peters.

Speaking up has actually prompted him to use his platform to ensure that the finances and chances are offered for other kids who may also deal with the exact same obstacles, particularly those in the BIPOC community.

"It's an all minority group so I'm overwhelmed with emotion and incredibly thrilled to be able to provide these kids the chance," Aliu stated.

He stated the children on the group come from a range of communities, consisting of Black, Brown, Asian and Indigenous.

"We feel like, if more kids from various demographics get into hockey, the pool of skill expands."

Coaches enjoyed take part

And while the team has been a great opportunity for the kids, it's been an unique moment for the other coaches as well.

Aaron Atwell, the group's assistant coach, said he is enjoyed be included.

"It's remarkable, I didn't think I 'd get to belong of something like this," Atwell said. "Growing up I 'd see P.K. Subban or Akim but never ever this lots of noticeable minorities, specifically on one team. I didn't believe that was ever possible. The kids are fantastic. They're brave for doing this."

Ryan Sirisombath, left, and Enrico Champagne, right, are 2 gamers on the group. (Talia Ricci/CBC)'It's not about how

you look. It's about how you play.'The gamers themselves have revealed excitement and thankfulness."What I like about hockey is the competitiveness,"said Enrico Champagne, among the gamers on the group. "I like hockey because I like scoring objectives and I can't wait to go to the

NHL and live my dream,"stated Ryan Sirisombath, another player on the group." It's not about how you look. It's about how you play."Aliu stated he hopes the experiences that the kids have belonging to the group will encompass their lives

beyond sports."I'm hoping I can offer them the tools, and our team here, jointly, can give them the tools to be successful, not just in hockey, however in life in general. "