Marathon swimmer Vicki Keith holds up bracelets provided to her by kids from the Kingston, Ont., YMCA. The very first person to swim throughout the five Great Lakes, she has actually raised over $1 million for programs to help kids with specials needs. (Stephen D. Cannerelli/The Post-Standard/Associated Press/File)

"Coming from a group sport, the individual recognition is often a little unpleasant," stated Hefford, a member of the 2010 Olympic gold medal group that was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame on Wednesday in Toronto.

"I was fortunate to get a chance to play sports in what was considered a male-dominating sport when I started [and] lucky to have household that encouraged me to follow my enthusiasm."

Waneek Horn-Miller

A pioneer, the 44-year-old is a Mohawk of Kahnawake from Montreal and first water polo player to be inducted to Canada's Sports Hall of Fame.

Horn-Miller won 1999 Pan Am gold in Winnipeg and 2 years later captained the Canadian team to an advancement world champion medal in Japan.

The first Mohawk woman to complete at the Olympic Games, she remains a strong and singing supporter of Indigenous sport in Canada and internationally.

"I wasn't the very best to play the sport of water polo however maybe the most vibrant and fascinating," stated Horn-Miller, co-captain of the first Canadian women's Olympic squad that placed fifth in Sydney in 2000.

"I desire to make certain that sport is available, not simply [by] those who have cash or live in the best location, but for all Canadians who reside in all parts of Canada.

"Maybe one day," she added, "we'll be watching the Olympics and I'll be sitting with my grandchildren and the announcers won't be saying, 'She's the first Mohawk female to go to the Olympics.' Instead, they'll be stating, 'Geez, those native athletes winning all the gold. Will you let another person win for as soon as?'"

Vicki Keith

Among the greatest marathon swimmers in history, the 57-year-old holds 18 world records and is best understood for crossing all five Great Lakes.

Now, she coaches the Kingston Y Penguins, a highly successful swim club out of Kingston, Ont., which supplies chance for aspiring athletes with a disability.

Keith, who has actually raised over $1 million for programs to assist kids with specials needs, said she is motivated "by every young adult I deal with advance, battling through challenges and conquering their own obstacles to discover their own success.

"It's not always about winning medals," continued Keith in an interview with CBC Sports. "Sometimes, it's just being able to step up in the world in their own course and achieving what's essential to them."

Doug Mitchell

The terrific customer of university sport in Canada gets in the Hall of Fame as a home builder. The commissioner of the CFL in the 1980s went a long way towards saving the league in economically tough times.

The 80-year-old continues to work as a member of the CFL's board of directors is a part owner of the Calgary Stampeders.

Mitchell's love for hockey also led to him playing a considerable role in promoting the Canadian Olympic program and acting as chair of an advisory group that received funding from Hockey Canada to help ice a competitive group at the 1980 Winter Games in Lake Placid, N.Y., following a 12-year absence.

In 2002, he was inducted to the Alberta Sports Hall of Fame, followed by the University of British Columbia Football Hall of Fame in 2012 and BC Football Hall of Fame in 2015.

"It's incredible what the power of sport does for communities and children," said Brodeur, who published a record 125 nothings in 1,266 video games, all however the last 7 with the New Jersey Devils."Then you see them come back five years later on, they're all grown up, have their own lives and they inform you how much you inspired them. Jayna Hefford won 4 gold medals in five Olympic appearances with the Canadian females's hockey group along and played in 12 world championships. Bilodeau: 'To be inducted with legends is a terrific honour'

In an interview with CBC Sports' Anastasia Bucsis prior to his induction into the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame, Alex Bilodeau recalls his memories from becoming the first Canadian to win an Olympic gold medal on home soil at the 2010 Vancouver Olympics. 3:08

Colette Bourgonje

A Métis athlete from Saskatchewan, Bourgonje was a 10-time Paralympian that will be inducted into the Canadian Paralympic Hall of Fame next month.

Now 57, she competed at seven Paralympics in nordic skiing and was a wheelchair racer at three others, integrating for three silver medals and seven bronze.

The very first athletics graduate in a wheelchair from the University of Saskatchewan resides in Prince Albert and continues to coach and teach in her home province.

Jayna Hefford

One of the more prolific ladies's hockey gamers, the 42-year-old Hefford's profession included four Olympic gold medals in 5 appearances.

She made the very first of her 12 world champion appearances in 1997 and won seven gold medals and five silver. Hefford retired in 2015 with 157 goals and 291 points in 267 games to rank 2nd all-time in Canadian ladies's hockey.

Jayna Hefford won 4 gold medals in 5 Olympic appearances with the Canadian ladies's hockey team along and played in 12 world champions. She made the first of her 12 world champion appearances in 1997 and won 7 gold medals and five silver. Instead, they'll be saying, 'Geez, those native athletes winning all the gold."It's not always about winning medals," continued Keith in an interview with CBC Sports. The fantastic customer of university sport in Canada goes into the Hall of Fame as a builder.


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